Wanted, Executive Director, Humanitarian OpenStreetMap Team (HOT OSM)

An interesting career opportunity has popped up in our GeoJobsBIZ Career portal as HOT is seeking an executive Director. Recall,  HOT applies the principles of open source and open data sharing to improve the welfare of the communities where we work, especially those at risk of natural disaster or other crisis.

HOT OSM

The successful candidate will approach HOT with creativity and drive leading us to grow into the future. [Read more…]

OSM Plus 2014 Takes Place Following State of the Map DC

A reminder of this event comes my way via Peter Batty, through Steve coast – enter OSM Plus 2014. An event for OpenStreetMap enthusiasts and businesses looking to leverage OSM and OSM-based solutions for their business.

Details about the event, which takes place directly after the DC State of the Map (SOTM) event… This year we will focus on discussion points and panels, bringing together the spectrum of users of OSM data to jointly figure out how to manage quality, fix the holes and efficiently leverage OSM while remaining respectful of the licensing issues that surround the project.

OSM Plus

Read more about OSM Plus on Steve Coast’s blog

See details of SOTM 2014

Update on OSM Crisis Mappers in the Philippines

An update from the Heidelberg University describes more than 1.000 OpenStreet Map (OSM) Crisis Mapping Volunteers developing a CrisisMap for the Philippines. The map shows Elements at Risk, population distribution, damaged buildings and Instagram images for Philippines. This update from the team…For supporting the disaster management activities after the typhoon Yolanda/Haiyan a new Crisis Map: http://crisismap.geog.uni- heidelberg.de/ has been set up by GIScience Research Group at Heidelberg University that visualizes map layers as the map layers showing population density and “elements at risk” for the Philipines. Credits for this voluntary effort go to Pascal Neis, Andreas Reimer, Maxim Rylow, Bernd Resch, Günter Sagl, Joao Porto and colleagues.

Note: A Mapathon to support crisis mapping with OpenStreetMap has been organized by Andreas Reimer and colleagues at Heidelberg University on Thursday Nov. 14th 2013.

See more on the University blog

Get More Involved with OSM by Joining MapClub

Map Club is a new effort created by OSM founder Steve Coast (@steveC) and aims to be a friendly and supportive community to help people get more involved and productive with OpenStreetMap. According to Steve in a recent Hangout with James Fee (@cageyjames) challenges are faced with OSM, in particular with  addressing and navigation attributes and with getting the community more involved with adding useful information to help with these areas.

The following options for membership are currently available from the MapClub:

  • Founding Member. For $4/month, access all map club services, starting with our mailing list of people like you.
  • Founding Pro Member. For $9/month, access all map club services, starting with our mailing list of people like you. In addition, Pro members influence the direction of the club by voting on what is to be built and receive a club t-shirt!
  • Founding Enterprise members are just like Pro members, for your entire organization.

This from MapClub… “Our long-term goal is to make sure OSM is complete, including address data and routing metadata.” See http://mapclub.com/

New OSM Map Services from GIScience Uni Heidelberg

An update from Germany as we hear about a couple of new OSM Web map services.  These are based on research results in cartography of some researchers
from the GIScience Research Group at Heidelberg University  (http://giscience.uni-hd.de ).

The first one deals with automated high quality map labeling (Text
positioning) and is being introduced here: It presents a new and sophisticated approach for calculating the placement of map labels using a multi-criteria method. See more at http://www.openmapsurfer.uni-hd.de/

The second one uses a new method to determine the scale to which the
underling OpenStreetMap data corresonds to and presents the resulting
scale equivalencies for residential areas in OSM.
This is a important new information for the usablity of OSM data, as
previously the scale range of an OSM dataset was unknown. See more info HERE and see the web service HERE

OpenCage Data – OpenStreetMap (OSM) Data in the format you want

OpenCage Data  http://www.opencagedata.com/ – a new effort that guarantees to make using OSM data easy for organizations and to help users get OpenStreetMap data in the format they want it! Born out of London-based Lokku (a 15 person team), the team, best known for running Nestoria (see http://www.nestoria.com)  has sponsored numerous State of the Map conferences, mapping parties, and made major donations to HOT-OSM and OSMF’s server drives. To kick off this effort OpenCage Data has gathered together a who’s-who in the Geospatial World to head up their board of advisors, these include Andy Allan (OSM developer), Gari Araolaza, Gary Gale (Nokia HERE), Marc Prolieau, Marc Tobias Metten, Sajjad Anwar, Steven Feldman, and Tyler Bell (Factual). – See more

opencage data

Just in Time for SOTMUS, The 2013 OpenStreetMap (OSM) Report

Just in time for the 2013 SOTMUS event taking place June 8-9 in San Fran, The 2013 OpenStreetMap Data Report – some stunning and interactive data visualizations that show how active the OpenStreetMap community is, how fast it continues to grow, and how competitive the open data community is becoming.

There’s no doubt that the spread of love about OSM is hitting and epidemic scale! At this year’s SOTMUS event, the Mapbox team will be presenting details of the 2013 OSM report, a comprehensive look at the explosive growth of the OpenStreetMap movement.

See More – The 2013 OpenStreetMap (OSM) Report – over 1 million contributors!

 

Source: gisuser.com via Glenn on Pinterest

Editing OpenStreetMap (OSM) Just Got Really Easy With iD Map Editor

There’s no arguing that OpenStreetMap (OSM) has exploded in use and popularity, heck, just look at the basemap layer options in any online web mapping services and you’ll see OSM as an option. Often considered the wikipedia of the mapping world, OSM is a fabulous basemap option for anyone and perhaps coolest of all, OSM has been built and maintained by you – the crowd!

I’m sure that many (if not most) of you have often wanted to mess around with OSM and add/edit some features but were a little lazy – I’m guilty! But now we have no excuse thanks to the new OpenStreetMap in-browser map editing tools available from the iD Editor (think HTML5)

See more in this first look and example of how to add a new feature, like a local business!


Once completed you can share your edits via Twitter or facebook